The Creative Thinker's Toolkit PDF Free Download

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Download Free PDF. The Artist's Guide To Illustration - The Ultimate Tutorial Collection. The Artist's Guide To Illustration - The Ultimate Tutorial Collection. Misticuilly Manzhano. Download Download PDF. Full PDF Package Download Full PDF Package. A short summary of this paper. 0 Full PDFs related to this paper. In this book 'The Creative Thinker's Toolkit, Professor Gerard Puccio declared that creativity is also about deliberate practice with proper strategies. He was not only preaching. He structured the creative problem-solving skills into science, with principles revolving around the balance between divergence and convergence thinking.

What is the one life skill you would like to improve on? My guess is many of you would answer ‘creativity’. And rightfully so! Educators consider creative thinking as one of the most important life skills and competencies for the 21st century. According to a report from the World Economic Forum (The Future of Jobs Report, 2020), “skills related to creativity will be in high demand between now and 2025”. Teacher and trainer, Mauricio Shiroma, shares 3 lessons for introducing creativity into your classroom using the Cambridge Life Competencies Framework.

Creativity is part of what makes us human. A case in point is the fact that we can provide artificial intelligence to the most powerful computers and have them model creativity to teach them how creative ideas arise in people’s minds. Still, they would not be able to select what is relevant or valuable without human help. And yet, creativity remains a mysterious and fascinating skill, so much so that it had been considered a supernatural force, a gift from the gods until the beginning of the modern era. Even to this day, scientific studies are not able to detect parts of the brain that are specifically associated with creativity and many questions remain unanswered. Some scientists even argue that a percentage of creativity is hereditary. That is actually great news because it means that creativity is mostly learned and comes from different external and internal sources. Therefore, fostering creative thinking in the classroom should be a teacher’s greatest concern.

Cambridge Life Competencies Framework

The creative thinker' s toolkit pdf free download windows 10

Most educators would agree that creativity should be an integral part of the teaching process, not only to help students get good grades but to prepare them to succeed in life. On the other hand, the need for grading students’ performance and restrictions in the amount of time available often prevent the implementation of activities that would encourage creative thinking. So, how can we start incorporating creative thinking practices into our class plans? Cambridge University Press has developed the CambridgeLife Competencies Framework to help teachers understand how some important life skills for the 21st century can be integrated into English language programmes. Each competency is divided into 3 areas. In the case of creative thinking, these areas are:

– preparing for creativity

– generating ideas

– implementing ideas and solving problems

We can prepare students for creativity by having them participate in activities that promote the development of creative skills (role-play, listening to music, performing artistic tasks, brainstorming grammar rules, and meaning of unfamiliar words, playing games where they put themselves into someone else’s shoes to have different perspectives, etc). Students can be encouraged to generate ideas by creating a safe environment in which they are not afraid to make suggestions during activities, by helping them explain what they mean in detail, and by complimenting them on their originality and imagination. We help students implement ideas and solve problems by letting them try and refine things they have imagined in class. These are simple actions that can easily be adopted and included in your teaching practices.

It might seem a lot to have in mind while you are teaching, so try to have these three basic lessons on creative thinking in mind before, during, and after classes.

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Creativity starts with imagination

There are plenty of moments during your class to encourage the use of imagination. Have students think of what might have happened after the end of a story. Invite them to create a background story for someone in a picture. Ask them to try to explain how things happen or why they exist. Challenge them to produce creative answers or solutions to situations presented in a text. You can always work with what is between the lines, shown in images, or proposed in activities.

If students have ideas but never put them into practice, they are practicing imagination, not creativity

It is great to have students use their imagination to discuss possibilities. But make sure that occasionally they get something done with it. For instance, you can ask them to imagine they are on a desert island and need to make a list of things they need to survive. But how useful and practical is it? Aren’t there other scenarios in which they can apply the results of the creating thinking process? Can you create a real-life situation in school in which students have to find creative ways to solve a problem and put them to the test for real?

Creativity needs practice and discipline to become something that can be learned and improved

How about creating a tradition for your classes? Can you think of an activity that would happen repeatedly during the school term, something that can be done on a regular basis that would be engaging to your group of students and challenge them to be creative? Whatever you choose to do, remember that the more students practice creative thinking, the better they become at it.

I am not sure there is a single answer to how you can incorporate these principles into your teaching, so I’ll leave you with some food for thought:

– What am I doing to become a more creative person myself?

The Creative Thinker's Toolkit PDF Free Download

– Have I discouraged creativity in my classes because I expect my students to give me a specific answer or to be obedient in class?

We live different realities. Nevertheless, we should always consider creative thinking as a key component of our teaching practices.

Catch up Mauricio’s webinar on creative thinking across the learning journey.

Mauricio Shiroma

Mauricio has taught English, trained EFL teachers, and worked for several ELT publishers before becoming a freelancer 10 years ago. He has worked as an author, contributor, and editor on a wide variety of publications from pre-school to upper secondary education, including preparatory courses intended for students who will take the National University Entrance Exam (ENEM).

What is the one life skill you would like to improve on? My guess is many of you would answer ‘creativity’. And rightfully so! Educators consider creative thinking as one of the most important life skills and competencies for the 21st century. According to a report from the World Economic Forum (The Future of Jobs Report, 2020), “skills related to creativity will be in high demand between now and 2025”. Teacher and trainer, Mauricio Shiroma, shares 3 lessons for introducing creativity into your classroom using the Cambridge Life Competencies Framework.

Creativity is part of what makes us human. A case in point is the fact that we can provide artificial intelligence to the most powerful computers and have them model creativity to teach them how creative ideas arise in people’s minds. Still, they would not be able to select what is relevant or valuable without human help. And yet, creativity remains a mysterious and fascinating skill, so much so that it had been considered a supernatural force, a gift from the gods until the beginning of the modern era. Even to this day, scientific studies are not able to detect parts of the brain that are specifically associated with creativity and many questions remain unanswered. Some scientists even argue that a percentage of creativity is hereditary. That is actually great news because it means that creativity is mostly learned and comes from different external and internal sources. Therefore, fostering creative thinking in the classroom should be a teacher’s greatest concern.

Cambridge Life Competencies Framework

Most educators would agree that creativity should be an integral part of the teaching process, not only to help students get good grades but to prepare them to succeed in life. On the other hand, the need for grading students’ performance and restrictions in the amount of time available often prevent the implementation of activities that would encourage creative thinking. So, how can we start incorporating creative thinking practices into our class plans? Cambridge University Press has developed the CambridgeLife Competencies Framework to help teachers understand how some important life skills for the 21st century can be integrated into English language programmes. Each competency is divided into 3 areas. In the case of creative thinking, these areas are:

– preparing for creativity

– generating ideas

Creative

– implementing ideas and solving problems

We can prepare students for creativity by having them participate in activities that promote the development of creative skills (role-play, listening to music, performing artistic tasks, brainstorming grammar rules, and meaning of unfamiliar words, playing games where they put themselves into someone else’s shoes to have different perspectives, etc). Students can be encouraged to generate ideas by creating a safe environment in which they are not afraid to make suggestions during activities, by helping them explain what they mean in detail, and by complimenting them on their originality and imagination. We help students implement ideas and solve problems by letting them try and refine things they have imagined in class. These are simple actions that can easily be adopted and included in your teaching practices.

It might seem a lot to have in mind while you are teaching, so try to have these three basic lessons on creative thinking in mind before, during, and after classes.

Creativity starts with imagination

There are plenty of moments during your class to encourage the use of imagination. Have students think of what might have happened after the end of a story. Invite them to create a background story for someone in a picture. Ask them to try to explain how things happen or why they exist. Challenge them to produce creative answers or solutions to situations presented in a text. You can always work with what is between the lines, shown in images, or proposed in activities.

If students have ideas but never put them into practice, they are practicing imagination, not creativity

Famous creative thinker

It is great to have students use their imagination to discuss possibilities. But make sure that occasionally they get something done with it. For instance, you can ask them to imagine they are on a desert island and need to make a list of things they need to survive. But how useful and practical is it? Aren’t there other scenarios in which they can apply the results of the creating thinking process? Can you create a real-life situation in school in which students have to find creative ways to solve a problem and put them to the test for real?

Creativity needs practice and discipline to become something that can be learned and improved

How about creating a tradition for your classes? Can you think of an activity that would happen repeatedly during the school term, something that can be done on a regular basis that would be engaging to your group of students and challenge them to be creative? Whatever you choose to do, remember that the more students practice creative thinking, the better they become at it.

I am not sure there is a single answer to how you can incorporate these principles into your teaching, so I’ll leave you with some food for thought:

– What am I doing to become a more creative person myself?

The Creative Thinker's Toolkit

– Have I discouraged creativity in my classes because I expect my students to give me a specific answer or to be obedient in class?

We live different realities. Nevertheless, we should always consider creative thinking as a key component of our teaching practices.

Catch up Mauricio’s webinar on creative thinking across the learning journey.

Mauricio Shiroma

The Creative Thinker' S Toolkit Pdf Free Download Free

Mauricio has taught English, trained EFL teachers, and worked for several ELT publishers before becoming a freelancer 10 years ago. He has worked as an author, contributor, and editor on a wide variety of publications from pre-school to upper secondary education, including preparatory courses intended for students who will take the National University Entrance Exam (ENEM).